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Forum Index > Discussion > 1966 Fleetwood Series 75 Build

rajeevx7 11 months ago
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Pic dump! As usual, click my name then view my album for full photos. In order:
1) Sniper engagement of trans kick down
2) Port matched gasket for Sniper butterflies
3) Blocked exhaust ports in intake manifold (fiber exhaust pipe leak repair strip cut down and covered with exhaust rtv after pic was taken
4) Sniper installed before wire loom coverings
5) Repaired tail lights with hard plastic lens stickers. Does not cover entire OE lense with just two packages, but get most of it. The bumpys are now on the outside, but you have to get pretty close to my rear end to see the plastic add ons. 
6) Tail light sockets replaced with 1157 and 1156 sockets and leds. You can perfect this install and get them straight by removing the mount rings off the oe sockets and welding them to the new sockets. I did one that way, but decided against it after seeing the even light distribution under the lens even with a crooked socket. I covered the sockets with waterproof gooey ac duct tape.
7) Bags aired about all out, less than 20psi in them.

rajeevx7 11 months ago
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I highly recommend the Holley Sniper EFI. Half turn the key dead cold and she fires...every time so far. The throttle and trans kick down linkage and push are super easy no brainers. Everything lines up. I choose not use the factory plastic carb insulator/spacer and mounted it straight to the intake manifold. You must block off your intake manifold exhaust crossover pipes.
A couple fittings for the pcv and other vacuum hoses and you are set. Shop around, and you can easily find one shy of $1k msrp. The easy to follow instructions are probably worth $1k alone! 
I built my own fuel system for about $175. But, there is a pre made kit for about $250 out there from Holley. It's probably worth the time savings to just buy a fuel kit.
Look at my pics and you will see the fuse, fuel pump relay and coil relay mounted to the oem coil mount. The pic is before I covered the wires with he provided loom, so you can see what's going on.
1966 Cadi75 Guy 11 months ago
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Hi, 

really great work, its nice to see the car coming along.

Just curious, why block the intake manifold exhaust crossover pipes?

Thanks!
rajeevx7 11 months ago
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I had the car running with the Carter AFB and oem choke so it needed that crossover and exhaust heat riser on the right exhaust manifold. But, those two items are not needed with the EFI. The crossover will just heat up the throttle body for no reason and with it blocked you don't have to worry about any stray gasses seeping past the base gasket into the fresh air stream. And the heat riser is easy to remove and knock the butterfly out, or even easier to wire tie the valve open.
rajeevx7 10 months ago
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rajeevx7 10 months ago
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Paint and body! This stage means everything else is done and 99% sorted, but this stage may become the most daunting. Previous pic is of the LF door with the rust cut out of it. There was also a section removed at the sideview mirror, that I can not explain. It was about 6 perfect holes ranging from 1/4" to 1.25". WTF!!

If you are attempting to do metal work.....just go for it. It is more of a mental anxiousness than a real obstacle. Buy a sheet of steel from Home Depot. Make paper templates of your cut outs and transfer them to your sheet. Massage fit until you are pleased and weld it in! I'm a terrible welder, but the seam is sealed front and back and then bondo'd smooth. If I can do it, I promise you can:-)

These window frames are taken apart by first removing the top header, then both side rails can collapse towards each other and be pulled out. Mind your exterior exposed seams where the header meets the side rails and don't crack the paint there.
rajeevx7 8 months ago
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I added a few new pics to the album of some painted parts and a door hinge pin bushing kit.

 In the Dorman 38374 kit you get 4 pairs of different bushings. One set will fit, so you will have 6 extra bushings per box. On my rear  doors there were plastic bushings at the tapered end of the slide pins. I replaced these with new brass ones as well as the knurled pin side.I also noticed that there was no elongation of my bushings or hinge holes. So, while apart I crimped the [ hinge side in a vice so reassembly would be tighter. Although I don’t know the longevity of that method, there is no longer the very slight wiggle that was there to start with.

rajeevx7 3 months ago
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Are my pics opening for you guys? I specifically put them in the album here to be hosted so they would never disappear. Weird.

Got a new pic of the body sprayed! The car isn’t assembled yet, but 95% of the painting is done. Thank Allah

I was also able to track down the previous owners family and they sent me this cool story.

Raj – Sorry to be so long in responding to your phone call this summer re. the 1966 stretch limo.  The original owner was Edward B. Burling https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_B._Burling and the next owner was Thomas G. Corcoran https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thomas_Gardiner_Corcoran

rajeevx7 3 months ago
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Stoked!!!
rajeevx7 64 days ago
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The most cost effective weatherstrip I found was “sofseal” brand, model 2006 and 2007. Each number will have a bag of two complete strips with the “pegs” already installed. Very few of the pegs lined up with my door’s holes. I choose to get the most top header pegs to line up while also placing the molded 90* angle at a corner. After that, move the pegs to where they line up with the holes. Use a sharp razor to make new slits in the rubber and slide in the pegs. On my limo, the front two strips where too long and I cut out a section and connected the two ends in the middle of the bottom section of the door. 
The rear doors of the limo are so long, no section of weatherstrip had to be cut out, but the actual strip had to be stretched into place. Use the same technique to move the pegs to where you need them. 

All 4 were $60 shipped on eBay!
rajeevx7 64 days ago
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rajeevx7 59 days ago
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Freaking LR axle bearing exploded and shot the axle out the side! Luckily, the skirt caught the wheel, drum and axle while I coasted off the road. I think it has been wonky since I bought the car, just never investigated like I should have:-(

The pic shows the new bearing and retainer on the axle, the clear measuring gauge, and the pipe fitting I used to hammer on the bearing. There are mixed reviews of hammering vs the right way and pressing the bearing on. I don’t have a press at home, so this was my choice. I used a galvanized steel 1.5” plumbing pipe coupler from Home Depot. Hammer all the way around as even as possible to avoid cocking the bearing at an angle. Pretty hard to cock it due to the tight interference tolerance. I heated my bearing and retainer in the oven at 450 for 10min. The axle I soaked in ice water for the same time. I don’t know if any of that helped or not. The gauge is a long u shape with a sort of pointer on the end. The idea was to have the lip down at one end to catch through the measuring hole in the wheel stud flange and have a pointer over toward the axle at the 3-3/64” mark. That part worked great! The retainer is easy, just hammer it until it touches the bearing. It goes on easier due to less surface area across its face, so just a few pounds will get her down. It was room temp by the time I got to it:-) I’ll slip the complete axle back into the tube this weekend. 

Overall, since I didn’t have to cut or press the old bearing off, it was a surprisingly easy job. 
rajeevx7 59 days ago
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rajeevx7 23 hours ago
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rajeevx7 22 hours ago
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Leaky pinion seal? Read on! 
I had this persistent stain added to my nice garage floor by this boat of a car. Nope, not gonna fly:-) There are other ways to break this pinion nut free, but I choose to do this on my back and under jackstands, no air tools, special tools or torches. The pictures are uploaded to my album, and here are the steps.

1) put the trans in neutral so you can spin the driveshaft. Use a 5/8” wrench to remove the four shaft flange bolts at the pinion. Don’t pull the driveshaft out of the trans, push it further into it and lay the diff. end on the ground. You won’t loose any trans fluid this way..
2) engage parking break hard, and even depress the brake pedal if you can. Just do what you can to keep the wheels from turning.
3) use a paint pen to mark across the nut, pinion shaft and outer yoke flange. Also, count the threads sticking out past the nut. The key is to get the nut back on close to where it’s been sitting, in my case since 1966!
4) look at the nut closley, and you will see a dimple “stake” mark across two of the splits on the nut. Just tap a chisel into that split to slightly spread the nuts and break the “stake” dimple a bit.
5) this pinion nut is put on between 200-350ft lbs of force at the factory. Yes, it’s a lot, more than it sounds! I wedged a 1.5” galvanized steel pipe coupler between the diff’s snout bump plate and a bolt screwed into the yoke flange. Then, use a 1.25” socket to capture the pinion nut and extend a ratchet handle out onto a floor jack. Jack up the ratchet handle until that nut breaks free. This may take a few tries, but it’s very possible.
6) with the nut off, use a 3-jaw puller to get the yolk flange off the pinion shaft.
7) no you can see the stock seal, sticking out of the diff by 3/16”. Use a chisel to catch the edge and dent the seal towards the shaft. You end up with a pac-man shaped seal. Use a 90* needle nose to get the seal out. 
8) clean everything! I used #000 steel wool to polish the sealing surfaces. Tap in the new seal. I used a coat of rtv on the outer surface of the new seal. I did not use rtv on the flange splines. 
9) line up the flange mark with the shaft mark and press the flange back on using the nut. Just use the galvanized pipe coupler on the right side of the yoke flange to brace against the bump plate to tighten the nut. Tighten until the marks are aligned and the proper amount of threads are revealed in front of the nut. 
10) refill diff fluid 75,80 or 85w-90. 

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